Contact   |   User Forum
 
About HAVEit   |   Events   |   Media   |   Sub-Projects   |   Highly Automated Driving   |   Public Documents   |   Imprint
 
 
  Press Releases
  Driving at the Press of a Button
  Continental Achieves Highly-Automated Driving Using Production-Ready Technologies
  A Truck that Keeps Track in Congestion
  Driving without a Driver – Volkswagen presents the “Temporary Auto Pilot”
  Predicting the Future for Advanced Energy Management
  Electrical Brake System Increases Traffic Safety and Handling of Trucks
  Assistance and Automation Levels Enhance Future Driving Safety, Efficiency and Comfort
  Continental Achieves Highly-Automated Driving Using Production-Ready Technologies
  Highly Automated Driving Taking Shape
  2010 Annual EUCAR Conference: Volkswagen Group Research gives presentation of EU Commission HAVEit research project
  Basic Information
  Images and Videos
  Newsletter
  Press Contact


Driving at the Press of a Button

At the HAVEit Final Event, 17 partners from the European automotive industry and scientific community are set to demonstrate the highly automated future of driving. The EU funded project aimed at increasing driving safety and boosting the European automotive industry in the international market.

Frankfurt am Main / Borås (Sweden), 21 June 2011. An automated vehicle drives through a narrow construction site, and the driver does not steer, accelerate or brake one single time. Another car passes the vehicle in front of it, after the driver pushes the appropriate button. A truck recognizes a traffic jam and automatically slows down. All of these highly automated driving features have been developed through the collaboration of the European automotive industry and scientific community, with an eye toward making driving safer, more environmentally-friendly and more comfortable. The developments will be presented today and tomorrow at the Final Event of the EU funded research project HAVEit (“Highly automated vehicles for intelligent transport”) in Borås (Sweden) and at the nearby Hällered Volvo test track. Seven demonstration vehicles will be on display.

“In view of increasing traffic density, the growing flood of information available to drivers and the rising average age of the population, highly automated vehicles will characterize the future of mobility. Automation will relieve drivers of some of the stress of driving as it guides them through traffic more efficiently, using more environmentally friendly technology”, said HAVEit project coordinator Dr. Reiner Hoeger. 17 partners from the European automotive industry, including Continental, Volvo Group, Volkswagen and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), worked together to develop vehicle concepts and technologies through this project. The consortium received financial support from the European Union. Aside from networking technical innovations from research and science, HAVEit also aimed to secure the top spot in the international automotive industry for Europe and to tie together research and development resources. Partners from various EU member states are working on an interdisciplinary basis in projects like HAVEit, to strengthen Europe’s international competitive position in a market full of technical challenges.

Highly automated vehicles can take over three main driving functions: steering (lateral automation), path planning (longitudinal automation) and navigation. The aim is to make driving easier for people and create highly automated systems which they can use intuitively. As part of the HAVEit project, three automation modes which can be selected and activated by drivers were developed and implemented in all demonstration vehicles. In the first mode, the driver steers the vehicle alone, assisted by already-available standard driver assistance systems, such as lane keep assist or an emergency brake assist. In partly or semi-automated mode, the vehicle drives with longitudinal automation, so drivers no longer have to accelerate or brake. At the level of high automation, lateral automation comes into play, meaning the driver no longer has to steer. Despite the level of automation selected, the driver is always fully responsible for maneuvering the vehicle and can take control in place of the system at any time. The driver also has to monitor the vehicle’s driving maneuvers. In the partly and highly automated modes, the system observes the driver with the help of a camera located inside the vehicle. The moment the driver stops paying attention to the road, the assistant prompts them to take control of the wheel. The German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Wuerzburg Institute of Traffic Sciences (WIVW) developed the concepts of adaptive communication between the driver and the automated vehicle.

Seven vehicles will be presented at the project’s Final Event today, and these will be separated into two groups:
• Four vehicles are concerned with the development of driver assistant features for innovative safety, comfort and environmentally-friendly driving. They display integrated features made possible through technology which is already widely available. The applications which have been developed within the framework of this project are an Automated Assistance for Roadworks and Congestion and a Temporary Auto-Pilot. Each of these features will be demonstrated in one vehicle each. Automated Queue Assistance will be demonstrated in a truck. An Active Green Driving hybrid bus will also be presented.
• The other three vehicles will draw attention to innovative components of safety design: These vehicles will display designs and a migration strategy for highly automated driving. In addition, by-wire actuators have been developed to open the way for fully automated driving. The applications which have resulted from this include a Brake-by-Wire Truck for Open Roads, a Joint System Interaction and an Architecture Migration Demonstrator vehicle.
Having created the foundation for the development of a series of highly automated features, the HAVEit project is a huge milestone for the future of mobility. “The aim of the project was to develop ideas which we could actually implement within the foreseeable future and which could be brought to the streets,” Dr. Hoeger said. “Several of the ideas we have developed in the HAVEit project could be further developed and start series production within the next five to ten years.” In the process, HAVEit has also shown how Europe’s spirit of research and entrepreneurship can discover shared answers and solutions for the mobility of the future.

About HAVEit
The EU funded R&D project HAVEit („Highly Automated Vehicles for Intelligent Transport“) is set to develop research concepts and technologies for highly automated driving. This will help to reduce the drivers’ workload, prevent accidents, reduce environmental impact and make traffic safer. Launched in February 2008, 17 European partners from the automotive and supply sector as well as from the scientific community collaborate in the project. In total, investments of EUR 28 million were made into HAVEit, EUR 17 million of which were EU grants and EUR 11 million were contributed by the 17 partners, of which EUR 7 million are invested by the automobile industry. The HAVEit consortium consists of vehicle manufacturers, automotive suppliers and scientific institutes from Germany, Sweden, France, Austria, Switzerland, Greece and Hungary:
Continental, Volvo Technology AB, Volkswagen AG, EFKON AG, Sick AG, Haldex Brake Products AB, Knowllence, Explinovo GmbH, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), University of Athens, Institute of Communications and Computer Systems (ICCS), University of Applied Sciences Amberg-Weiden, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Universität Stuttgart, Institut für Luftfahrtsysteme, Wuerzburg Institute of Traffic Sciences GmbH, Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (Inria), Institut français des sciences et technologies des transports, de l'aménagement et des réseaux (IFSTTAR).
For further information please visit: www.haveit-eu.org

Fahren per Knopfdruck

Beim HAVEit Final Event demonstrieren 17 europäische Partner aus Automobilindustrie und Wissenschaft das hochautomatisierte Fahren der Zukunft. Mit Hilfe des EU-geförderten Projekts soll die Fahrsicherheit erhöht und auch die internationale Wettbewerbsfähigkeit der europäischen Automobilindustrie gestärkt werden.

Frankfurt am Main / Borås (Schweden), den 21. Juni 2011
. Ein Fahrzeug fährt automatisiert durch eine enge Baustelle, ohne dass der Fahrer selbst lenken, Gas geben oder bremsen muss. Ein weiteres Auto überholt selbsttätig, sobald der Fahrer den entsprechenden Knopf drückt. Ein Lkw erkennt einen Stau und wird automatisch langsamer. All diese hochautomatisierten Fahrfunktionen sind gemeinschaftliche Entwicklungen der europäischen Automobilindustrie und Wissenschaft, die zukünftig das Fahren sicherer, umweltschonender und bequemer machen. Sie werden heute und morgen bei der Abschlussveranstaltung des EU-geförderten Forschungsprojekts HAVEit („Highly automated vehicles for intelligent transport“) im schwedischen Borås und auf der nahegelegenen Volvo Teststrecke Hällered anhand von sieben Demonstrationsfahrzeugen präsentiert.

„Durch die stark ansteigende Verkehrsdichte, die weiter zunehmende Informationsflut, der der Fahrer ausgesetzt ist, sowie das steigende Durchschnittsalter der Bevölkerung wird die Zukunft der Mobilität von hochautomatisierten Fahrzeugen geprägt sein. Damit werden Fahrer entlastet und gleichzeitig effizienter und umweltschonender durch den Verkehr gelotst“, sagte HAVEit-Projektkoordinator Dr. Reiner Höger. Für die Entwicklung dieser Fahrzeugkonzepte und -technologien arbeiteten 17 europäische Partner aus der Automobilindustrie sowie aus der Wissenschaft zusammen, darunter Continental, Volvo Group, Volkswagen und das Deutsche Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR). Dabei wurde das Konsortium mit Fördergeldern der Europäischen Union unterstützt. Neben der Vernetzung technischer Innovationen aus Forschung und Wissenschaft zielte HAVEit auch darauf ab, die führende Stellung der europäischen Automobilindustrie international zu sichern sowie Ressourcen für Forschung und Entwicklung zu bündeln. Partner aus verschiedenen Mitgliedsstaaten der Europäischen Union arbeiten – unter anderem in Projekten wie HAVEit – interdisziplinär zusammen, um die globale Wettbewerbsfähigkeit Europas in einem Markt mit vielen technologischen Herausforderungen zu stärken.

Prinzipiell können beim hochautomatisierten Fahren drei Funktionen übernommen werden: die Lenkung (Querautomatisierung), die Bahnplanung (Längsautomatisierung) sowie die Navigation. Ziel ist es, den Menschen zu entlasten und hochautomatisierte Systeme so zu gestalten, dass sie vom Menschen intuitiv genutzt werden können. Im Zuge des HAVEit Projekts wurden drei Automatisierungsstufen entwickelt, die in allen Demonstratoren realisiert wurden und die der Fahrer auswählt und aktiviert. In der ersten Stufe fährt der Fahrer selbst, aber assistiert von bereits serienmäßig verfügbaren Fahrerassistenzsystemen, beispielsweise einem Spurhalte- oder Notbremsassistenten. Im teil- bzw. semiautomatisierten Modus fährt das Fahrzeug längsautomatisiert, sodass der Fahrer nicht mehr selbst Gas geben oder bremsen muss. Im der hochautomatisierten Stufe kommt noch die Querautomatisierung hinzu – der Fahrer muss also nicht mehr selbst lenken. Der Fahrer trägt jedoch unabhängig vom gewählten Fahrmodus stets die volle Verantwortung und kann das System jederzeit überstimmen. Zudem muss er das Fahrmanöver überwachen. Mit Hilfe einer Kamera im Innenraum der Fahrzeuge beobachtet das System den Fahrer im teil- und hochautomatisierten Modus. Sobald der Fahrer unaufmerksam ist, fordert ihn der Assistent auf, die Fahraufgabe wieder selbst zu übernehmen. Die Konzepte für eine angepasste Kommunikation zwischen Fahrer und automatisiertem Fahrzeug wurden vom Deutschen Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) sowie vom Würzburger Institut für Verkehrswissenschaften (WIVW) entwickelt.

Bei der heutigen Abschlussveranstaltung des Projekts werden sieben Fahrzeuge präsentiert, die in zwei Gruppen eingeteilt sind:
• Vier Fahrzeuge beschäftigen sich mit der Entwicklung von Fahrerassistenzfunktionen für innovative Sicherheit, Komfort und umweltfreundliches Fahren. Sie demonstrieren integrierte Funktionen mit heute bereits weitgehend verfügbarer Technik. Die Anwendungen, die im Rahmen des Projekts entwickelt wurden, sind eine Automated Roadwork Assistance sowie ein Temporary Auto-Pilot – beide Anwendungen werden jeweils in einem Pkw demonstriert. Daneben werden ein Lkw mit Automated Queue Assistance und ein Active Green Driving Hybridbus präsentiert.
• Die anderen drei Fahrzeugen befassen sich mit neuartigen Komponenten der Sicherheitsarchitektur: Hier geht es zum einen darum, Architekturen und eine Migrationsstrategie für hochautomatisiertes Fahren zu demonstrieren. Zum anderen wurden „by wire“-Aktuatoren entwickelt, die Wege zum vollautomatisierten Fahren eröffnen. Die daraus entstandenen Anwendungen sind ein Brake-by-Wire Truck zum Einsatz auf öffentlichen Straßen, ein Joint System Interaction und ein Architecture Migration Demonstrator Fahrzeug.

Das HAVEit-Projekt ist ein großer Meilenstein für die Zukunft der Mobilität, da es die Grundlage zur Serienentwicklung von hochautomatisierten Anwendungen gelegt hat. „Ziel des Projekts war es, dennoch nicht abzuheben, sondern Ideen zu entwickeln, die in der Realität umsetzbar sind und auch in absehbarer Zeit auf die Straße gebracht werden können“, sagte Dr. Höger. „Einige der im Rahmen des HAVEit Projekts entwickelten Konzepte könnten innerhalb der nächsten fünf bis zehn Jahre zur Serienreife weiterentwickelt werden.“ Damit hat HAVEit auch demonstriert, wie Europas Forscher- und Unternehmergeist gemeinschaftliche Antworten und Lösungen für die Mobilität der Zukunft findet.

 

Über HAVEit
Das EU-geförderte Forschungsprojekt HAVEit („Highly Automated Vehicles for Intelligent Transport“) befasst sich mit der Entwicklung von Konzepten und Technologien zum hochautomatisierten Fahren. Damit sollen Autofahrer entlastet, Unfälle verhindert, Umweltbelastungen verringert und somit die Verkehrssicherheit erhöht werden. An dem im Februar 2008 gestarteten Projekt arbeiteten 17 europäische Partner aus der Automobil- und Zulieferindustrie sowie aus der Wissenschaft zusammen. Insgesamt wurden in das HAVEit Projekt 28 Millionen Euro investiert, wovon 17 Millionen Euro EU-Fördergelder sind – 11 Millionen Euro tragen die 17 Partner bei, 7 Millionen Euro davon investiert die Automobilindustrie. Das HAVEit Konsortium besteht aus Fahrzeugherstellern, Automobilzulieferern und wissenschaftlichen Einrichtungen aus Deutschland, Schweden, Frankreich, Österreich, der Schweiz, Griechenland und Ungarn:
Continental, Volvo Technology AB, Volkswagen AG, EFKON AG, Sick AG, Haldex Brake Products AB, Knowllence, Explinovo GmbH, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), University of Athens, Institute of Communications and Computer Systems (ICCS), Hochschule Amberg-Weiden, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Universität Stuttgart, Institut für Luftfahrtsysteme, Würzburger Institut für Verkehrswissenschaften (WIVW), Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (Inria), Institut français des sciences et technologies des transports, de l'aménagement et des réseaux (IFSTTAR).
Weitere Informationen finden Sie unter www.haveit-eu.org

The press release may be downloaded in English [.pdf] or in German [.pdf]
The HAVEit overview photo press kit is available for downloading both in English and German here [.pdf].
Photo in high resolution [.jpg].

Contact for journalists:
Nicole Geissler
External Communications
Continental
Division Chassis & Safety
Guerickestrasse 7
60488 Frankfurt am Main
Tel.:   +49 69 7603-8492
Fax:   +49 69 7603-3945
nicole.geissler@continental-corporation.com





Driving at the Press of a Button
Continental Achieves Highly-Automated Driving Using Production-Ready Technologies
Continental's Architecture Migration Demonstrator shows how a vehicle automation system with basic functions can be developed using the technologies available today. The system could soon be developed further into series production.

A Truck that Keeps Track in Congestion
Volvo’s prototype Automated Queue Assistance (AQuA) supports truck drivers in traffic congestion through numerous sensors that monitor the surroundings and take decisions autonomously.

Driving without a Driver – Volkswagen presents the “Temporary Auto Pilot”
Prof. Dr. Jürgen Leohold: “An important milestone on the path towards fully automatic and accident-free driving.”

Predicting the Future for Advanced Energy Management
A new generation of buses predicts the immediate future in order to better take advantage of their hybrid motor – Active Green Driving.

Electrical Brake System Increases Traffic Safety and Handling of Trucks
A new brake-by-wire-system shortens braking distance by 15 percent.

Assistance and Automation Levels Enhance Future Driving Safety, Efficiency and Comfort
Together with a European consortium of researchers, the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt – DLR) demonstrates how various driving tasks can be carried out in certain situations through a dynamic division of tasks betw

Continental Achieves Highly-Automated Driving Using Production-Ready Technologies
Continental's Architecture Migration Demonstrator shows how a vehicle automation system with basic functions can be developed using the technologies available today. The system could soon be developed further into series production.

Highly Automated Driving Taking Shape
EU funded project HAVEit is set to make vehicles safer, more environmentally- friendly and efficient by enhancing their level of automation. After more than three years of research work on intelligent driver assistance systems, seven vehicles demonstratin

2010 Annual EUCAR Conference: Volkswagen Group Research gives presentation of EU Commission HAVEit research project
Wolfsburg / Brussels, 2010-11-08 Prof. Juergen Leohold, Head of Volkswagen Group Research and a member of the EUCAR Council, today presented Volkswagen’s HAVEit research vehicle to the EU Commissioner for the Digital Agenda, Neelie Kroes.

 
   HAVEit - Highly Automated Vehicles for Intelligent Transport