Contact   |   User Forum
 
About HAVEit   |   Events   |   Media   |   Sub-Projects   |   Highly Automated Driving   |   Public Documents   |   Imprint
 
 
  Press Releases
  Driving at the Press of a Button
  Continental Achieves Highly-Automated Driving Using Production-Ready Technologies
  A Truck that Keeps Track in Congestion
  Driving without a Driver – Volkswagen presents the “Temporary Auto Pilot”
  Predicting the Future for Advanced Energy Management
  Electrical Brake System Increases Traffic Safety and Handling of Trucks
  Assistance and Automation Levels Enhance Future Driving Safety, Efficiency and Comfort
  Continental Achieves Highly-Automated Driving Using Production-Ready Technologies
  Highly Automated Driving Taking Shape
  2010 Annual EUCAR Conference: Volkswagen Group Research gives presentation of EU Commission HAVEit research project
  Basic Information
  Images and Videos
  Newsletter
  Press Contact


Assistance and Automation Levels Enhance Future Driving Safety, Efficiency and Comfort

Together with a European consortium of researchers, the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt – DLR) demonstrates how various driving tasks can be carried out in certain situations through a dynamic division of tasks between driver and vehicle.

Braunschweig (Germany) / Borås (Sweden), June 21, 2011. With the help of the FASCar II test vehicle and a driving simulator, the German Aerospace Center’s Institute of Transportation Systems and a European research consortium will demonstrate how vehicle assistance and automation features can provide optimal support to drivers, at the final event of the EU-supported HAVEit research project. By pushing a button, drivers will be able to choose if they would like to take over driving responsibilities, merely receiving “assistance” from the vehicle, or if they would like the vehicle to run at a semi-automated or even highly-automated level.

In the FASCar II, this interaction between driver and highly-automated vehicle is possible through environment sensors and a detailed positioning system, which precisely detects obstacles, objects and the driving lane, as well as through cutting edge steer-by-wire technology. In place of a mechanized steering rod, which links the steering wheel to the steering shaft, the steering input is transferred electronically (“by wire”). “Whereas the steering wheel in today’s vehicles moves according to steering motions, the steering wheel in the FASCar II can remain motionless during automated driving, or support the driver with suggestions during normal driving,” explained Prof. Karsten Lemmer, Director of the DLR Institute of Transportation Systems. “The vehicle can give the driver perceptible, tactile feedback, for example through vibrations, countersteering or jerking, while the steering shaft can be controlled entirely independently of these signals,” Prof. Karsten Lemmer continued.

Production-ready assistance features developed into highly-automated driving functions
Driving assistance systems which are already available today will be integrated with new highly-automated driving functions into a single concept in the FASCar II, making it possible to drive at different automation levels. At the “assisted” level, drivers will only receive support, for example receiving a tactile warning through the steering wheel that they are about to exit a driving lane, though they will need to steer the vehicle on their own. At the “semi-automated level”, the vehicle will take over certain driving tasks, although drivers are still able to take control of the vehicle at any time. During semi-automated driving the system takes over the functions of intelligent ACC (Adaptive Cruise Control), which automatically set the vehicle to drive at the desired speed or to stay at a certain distance behind a slower vehicle. At the “highly-automated” level, the vehicle can be driven with no hands on the steering wheel (hands off driving), as speed, distance adjustment, lane driving and overtaking are set and carried out automatically. Drivers can decide for themselves how many of the driving tasks they would like to leave up to the automation and can take control again at any time. The system gives drivers more safety and provides a more pleasant driving experience, for example during long journeys on the highway.

Future of intelligent driving: Switching between different automation levels
On the Volvo test track at the HAVEit final event, a demonstration will show how to alternate between different automation levels. By simply pushing a button, drivers can experience lane guidance, speed control and distance regulation at the three different levels of automation.

For example, changing lanes at the highly-automated level takes place in the following manner: The automation recommends a lane change in order to pass a slower vehicle ahead. Speed and distance are controlled automatically – drivers do not have to place their hands on the steering wheel nor their feet on the pedals. If it is reasonable to change lanes or if a slower vehicle can be passed, the vehicle suggests a lane change to the driver. After a short look in the mirror to ensure safety, the driver then uses the turn signal and briefly holds the steering wheel to approve the maneuver and the vehicle will automatically complete the lane change. After passing the car ahead, the automation suggests switching back to the right lane (in countries where driving on the right is a requirement by law), as long as the right lane is free. For instance, the vehicle stays in the driving lane, closes in on the car in front, follows it, changes lanes or slows down – almost entirely free of intervention from the driver.

The features of the semi-automated and highly-automated levels which allow the car to automatically stay at the speed limit and prevent passing on the right will also be demonstrated. Through these features, the automation follows the vehicle ahead at a safe distance, speeding up to the pre-set speed as soon as the slower vehicle ahead accelerates into the left lane and drives on. If there is a speed limit, the system receives this information through Car2Infrastructure communication (C2X) and the vehicle automatically adjusts its speed accordingly.

Furthermore, the switch from the “highly-automated” to “assisted” level will be demonstrated. Such a changeover occurs, for example, if the automation identifies signs that the driver is tired or distracted, or if the driving situation requires the driver’s assistance. In such cases the automation attempts to hand the active driving tasks back to the driver, who carries out and confirms the switch back to the “assisted” level. If the driver does not react, the automation brings the vehicle to a fully-automated and comfortable complete stop through a “minimum risk maneuver”.

The technological developments in highly automated driving demonstrated in Borås are leading technologies in many respects and will be continuously developed in the future. In Braunschweig, Germany, the DLR is currently expanding and enhancing its research on AIM (Application Platform for Intelligent Mobility) features, for example concerning C2X communications, in order to flexibly analyze traffic issues. This will include further user trials to test out interaction concepts, to make sure that drivers always react correctly on an intuitive basis. In the future, an extension of the features for use on streets and highways is also planned, and the steer-by-wire system will also be further developed and tested.

Modern hardware and software solutions from DLR and other partners
The FASCar II demonstration vehicle consists of a multitude of components from various HAVEit project partners. Along with its own steer-by-wire system, the German Aerospace Center integrated a host of features into the Volkswagen Passat, including the SICK laser scanner, Car2Car communication from the Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (INRIA), the Chassis & Safety Controller (ECU) from Continental and XCC controlling hardware for the steer-by-wire system from the University of Stuttgart’s Institute of Aeronautical Systems.

Several partners also worked together on the software components. The DLR developed the human-machine interface, tactile feedback, automation level selection, the FASCar II basic controller and the steer-by-wire system. The co-pilot maneuver generation system resulted from cooperation with the Institut français des sciences et technologies des transports, de l’aménagement et des réseaux (IFSTTAR), which also developed the trajectory tracking controller. Software integrated into the vehicle includes data fusion software from the University of Athens Institute of Communications and Computer Systems (ICCS), co-pilot trajectory generation from the Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (INRIA) and the driver condition recognition system from the Würzburg Institute for Traffic Sciences GmbH.


About HAVEit
The EU funded R&D project HAVEit („Highly Automated Vehicles for Intelligent Transport“) is set to develop research concepts and technologies for highly automated driving. This will help to reduce the drivers’ workload, prevent accidents, reduce environmental impact and make traffic safer. Launched in February 2008, 17 European partners from the automotive and supply sector as well as from the scientific community collaborate in the project. In total, investments of EUR 28 million were made into HAVEit, EUR 17 million of which were EU grants and EUR 11 million were contributed by the 17 partners, of which EUR 7 million are invested by the automobile industry. The HAVEit consortium consists of vehicle manufacturers, automotive suppliers and scientific institutes from Germany, Sweden, France, Austria, Switzerland, Greece and Hungary:
Continental, Volvo Technology AB, Volkswagen AG, EFKON AG, Sick AG, Haldex Brake Products AB, Knowllence, Explinovo GmbH, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), University of Athens, Institute of Communications and Computer Systems (ICCS), University of Applied Sciences Amberg-Weiden, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Universität Stuttgart, Institut für Luftfahrtsysteme, Wuerzburg Institute of Traffic Sciences GmbH, Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (Inria), Institut français des sciences et technologies des transports, de l'aménagement et des réseaux (IFSTTAR).
For further information please visit: www.haveit-eu.org


About the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt – DLR)
The DLR is the Federal Republic of Germany’s aerospace research center. Its extensive scope of research and development work is tied to national and international cooperative activities in aviation, astronautics, energy and traffic. DLR’s research portfolio extends from basic research to the development of ground-breaking applications and products of tomorrow. The scientific and technical know-how gained through DLR’s research helps to advance Germany’s industrial and technological development. Currently employing about 6,900 employees, the DLR maintains 33 institutes as well as test and operations facilities and has 13 locations in Germany.
Over 115 scientists, among them engineers, psychologists and computer scientists, work in the Institute of Transportation Systems at the Braunschweig and Berlin locations. They provide research and development for automotive and train systems and for traffic management, contributing to higher levels of safety and efficiency in road and rail traffic. The scientists work closely with national and international partners and clients from industry, science and politics.

 


Assistenz- und Automationsstufen erhöhen zukünftig Fahrsicherheit, Effizienz und Komfort

Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) demonstriert gemeinsam mit einem europäischen Forscherkonsortium, wie unterschiedliche Fahraufgaben situationsgerecht über eine dynamische Aufgabenteilung zwischen Fahrer und Fahrzeug gelöst werden können.

Braunschweig / Borås (Schweden), den 21. Juni 2011. Mithilfe des Versuchsfahrzeugs FASCar II und eines Fahrsimulators zeigt das Institut für Verkehrssystemtechnik des Deutschen Zentrums für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) gemeinsam mit einem europäischen Forscherkonsortium bei der Abschlussveranstaltung des EU-geförderten Forschungsprojekts HAVEit, wie Assistenz und Automation im Fahrzeug den Fahrer optimal unterstützen können. Per Tastendruck entscheidet der Fahrer zukünftig, ob er die Fahraufgabe selbst übernimmt und das Fahrzeug ihm lediglich „assistiert“ oder ob er das Fahrzeug „semiautomatisiert“ oder sogar „hochautomatisiert“ fahren lässt.

Dieses Zusammenspiel von Fahrer und hochautomatisiertem Fahrzeug ist im FASCar II zum einen möglich durch die Ausstattung mit Umfeldsensoren und einem präzisen Ortungssystem, um Hindernisse und Objekte sowie die Fahrspur genau zu erfassen. Zum anderen wird dies durch eine neuartige Steer-by-Wire-Lenkung ermöglicht: Anstelle einer mechanischen Lenkstange, die Lenkrad und -achse miteinander verbindet, werden die Lenkeingaben hierbei elektronisch („by wire“) übertragen. „Während sich das Lenkrad in heutigen Autos bei Lenkbewegungen entsprechend mit bewegt, kann das Lenkrad im FASCar II beim autonomen Fahren einfach stillstehen oder beim normalen Fahren den Fahrer mit Hinweisen unterstützen”, erklärt Prof. Dr. Karsten Lemmer, Direktor des DLR-Instituts für Verkehrssystemtechnik. „Das Fahrzeug kann dadurch spürbare, also haptische, Rückmeldungen an den Fahrer geben, wie zum Beispiel Vibrieren, Gegenlenken oder einen Ruck, während die Lenkachse völlig unabhängig davon gesteuert werden kann”, so Lemmer weiter.

Serienreife Assistenz wird in hochautomatisierten Fahrfunktionen weiterentwickelt
Heute bereits verfügbare Fahrerassistenzsysteme werden im FASCar II mit neuen Funktionen des hochautomatisierten Fahrens in einem Konzept integriert, welches das Fahren in verschiedenen Stufen der Automation ermöglicht. In der Stufe „Assistiert“ wird der Fahrer nur unterstützt, zum Beispiel erhält er über das Lenkrad eine haptische Warnung, dass er die Spur zu verlassen droht, lenken muss er jedoch selbst. In der Stufe „Semiautomatisiert“ werden dem Fahrer einzelne Fahraufgaben abgenommen, er kann aber jederzeit die Fahraufgabe wieder selbst übernehmen. Beim semiautomatisierten Fahren übernimmt das System auch die Funktionalität des intelligenten Abstandsregeltempomaten ACC (Adaptive Cruise Control), der automatisch die gewünschte Geschwindigkeit fährt oder den gewählten Abstand zu einem langsamer vorausfahrenden Fahrzeug einhält. In der Stufe „Hochautomatisiert“ kann ohne Hände am Lenkrad gefahren werden (Hands Off driving) – Geschwindigkeit, Abstandsanpassung, Spurhaltung und Überholmanöver werden automatisch ausgeführt. Der Fahrer entscheidet selbst, wie viel er von der Fahraufgabe an die Automation abgeben möchte, und kann diese auch jederzeit wieder übernehmen. So bietet das System dem Fahrer mehr Sicherheit und ermöglicht ein angenehmeres Fahren, zum Beispiel auf langen Autobahnfahrten.

Intelligentes Fahren der Zukunft: Wechsel zwischen verschiedenen Automationsstufen
Im Rahmen der HAVEit Abschlussveranstaltung wird auf der Teststrecke von Volvo vor allem der Wechsel zwischen den verschiedenen Automationsstufen demonstriert – er erfolgt über einen einfachen Tastendruck. Die Fahraufgaben Spurführung, Geschwindigkeitsreglung und Abstandsreglung in den drei verschiedenen Automationsstufen werden hierbei erfahrbar.

So wird zum einen ein Spurwechsel in der Automationsstufe „Hochautomatisiert“ demonstriert: Die Automation empfiehlt hierbei den Spurwechsel, um das langsamere Vorderfahrzeug zu überholen. Dabei erfolgt die Geschwindigkeits- und Abstandsregelung automatisch – dazu müssen weder die Hände am Lenkrad noch die Füße auf den Pedalen eingesetzt werden. Wenn ein Spurwechsel sinnvoll ist oder ein langsameres Fahrzeug überholt werden kann, schlägt das Fahrzeug dem Fahrer den Spurwechsel vor, den dieser nach einem absichernden Blick durch Blinken und einen kurzen Lenkeingriff freigibt – das Fahrzeug führt den Spurwechsel dann automatisch aus. Nach dem Überholen empfiehlt die Automation einen weiteren Spurwechsel nach rechts (Rechtsfahrgebot), insofern die rechte Spur frei ist. So folgt das Fahrzeug beispielsweise dem Fahrstreifen, nähert sich an ein Vorderfahrzeug an, folgt diesem, wechselt die Spur oder bremst ab – alles überwiegend ohne Eingriff des Fahrers.

Zum anderen wird die Situation einer Geschwindigkeitsbegrenzung und das Verhindern des Rechtsüberholens anhand der Automationsstufen „Semiautomatisiert“ und „Hochautomatisiert“ demonstriert: Dabei verhindert die Automation ein Überholen rechts und folgt dem Fahrzeug mit Sicherheitsabstand. Sobald das langsamere Vorderfahrzeug auf der linken Spur beschleunigt und davonfährt, beschleunigt das eigene Fahrzeug bis zur eingestellten Wunschgeschwindigkeit. Liegt eine Geschwindigkeitsbegrenzung vor, wird dies dem System mittels Car2Infrastructure Kommunikation (C2X) mitgeteilt und das Fahrzeug passt sich automatisch der Geschwindigkeitsbegrenzung an.

Des Weiteren wird die Übergabe an den Fahrer vom Automationslevel „Hochautomatisiert“ zu „Assistiert“ gezeigt: Ein solche Übergabe tritt zum Beispiel auf, wenn der Fahrer als müde oder abgelenkt erkannt wird oder die Fahrsituation eine Übergabe erfordert. Die Automation versucht in solchen Fällen, den Fahrer wieder aktiv in die Fahraufgabe einzubinden, der die Übernahme in die Stufe „Assistiert“ durchführt und bestätigt. Reagiert der Fahrer nicht, bringt die Automation das Fahrzeug mittels eines sogenannten „Minimum Risk Manövers“ (vollautomatisches, komfortables Anhalten) sicher zum Stillstand.

Der in Borås demonstrierte Technologiestand des hochautomatisierten Fahrens ist zurzeit in einigen Aspekten technologieführend und wird auch in Zukunft stetig weiterentwickelt. Das DLR erweitert und ergänzt derzeit in Braunschweig im Forschungsfeld AIM (Anwendungsplattform Intelligente Mobilität) Funktionalitäten, z.B. rund um die C2X Kommunikation zum Aufbau der flexiblen Erforschung verkehrlicher Fragestellungen. Dazu wird es weitere Nutzertests zur Erprobung der Interaktionskonzepte geben, damit der Fahrer immer intuitiv richtig reagiert. Zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt ist die Ausdehnung der Funktionalitäten auf andere Straßen als die Autobahn geplant. Schließlich wird auch das Steer-by-Wire-Lenkungssystem weiterentwickelt und erprobt.

Moderne Hard- und Software-Lösungen von DLR und weiteren Partnern
Das Demonstrationsfahrzeug FASCar II besteht aus einer Vielzahl von Komponenten von unterschiedlichen HAVEit-Projektpartnern: Das Deutsche Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt integrierte in den Volkswagen Passat neben der eigenentwickelten Steer-by-Wire-Lenkung auch einen Laser-Scanner von SICK, die Car2Car Kommunikation vom Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (INRIA), den Chassis & Safety Controller (ECU) von Continental sowie die XCC Steuerhardware des Instituts für Luftfahrtsysteme der Universität Stuttgart für die Steer-by-Wire-Lenkung.

Auch für die Software arbeiteten mehrere Partner zusammen. Die Mensch-Maschine-Schnittstelle, das haptische Feedback, die Auswahl der Automationsstufe, der FASCar II-Basisregler und die Steer-by-Wire-Ansteuerung entwickelte das DLR. Die Copilot-Manöver Generierung entstand in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Institut français des sciences et technologies des transports, de l'aménagement et des réseaux (IFSTTAR), das auch den Trajektorienfolgeregler erarbeitete. Software zur Datenfusion wurde vom Institute of Communications and Computer Systems (ICCS) der Universität von Athen, die Copilot-Trajektoriengenerierung vom Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (INRIA) und die Fahrerzustandserkennung vom Würzburger Institut für Verkehrswissenschaften (WIVW) in das Fahrzeug integriert.

 

Über HAVEit
Das EU-geförderte Forschungsprojekt HAVEit („Highly Automated Vehicles for Intelligent Transport“) befasst sich mit der Entwicklung von Konzepten und Technologien zum hochautomatisierten Fahren. Damit sollen Autofahrer entlastet, Unfälle verhindert, Umweltbelastungen verringert und somit die Verkehrssicherheit erhöht werden. An dem im Februar 2008 gestarteten Projekt arbeiteten 17 europäische Partner aus der Automobil- und Zulieferindustrie sowie aus der Wissenschaft zusammen. Insgesamt wurden in das HAVEit Projekt 28 Millionen Euro investiert, wovon 17 Millionen Euro EU-Fördergelder sind – 11 Millionen Euro tragen die 17 Partner bei, 7 Millionen Euro davon investiert die Automobilindustrie. Das HAVEit Konsortium besteht aus Fahrzeugherstellern, Automobilzulieferern und wissenschaftlichen Einrichtungen aus Deutschland, Schweden, Frankreich, Österreich, der Schweiz, Griechenland und Ungarn:
Continental, Volvo Technology AB, Volkswagen AG, EFKON AG, Sick AG, Haldex Brake Products AB, Knowllence, Explinovo GmbH, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), University of Athens, Institute of Communications and Computer Systems (ICCS), Hochschule Amberg-Weiden, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Universität Stuttgart, Institut für Luftfahrtsysteme, Würzburger Institut für Verkehrswissenschaften (WIVW), Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (Inria), Institut français des sciences et technologies des transports, de l'aménagement et des réseaux (IFSTTAR).
Weitere Informationen finden Sie unter www.haveit-eu.org

 

Über das Deutsche Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR)
Das DLR ist das Forschungszentrum der Bundesrepublik Deutschland für Luft- und Raumfahrt. Seine umfangreichen Forschungs- und Entwicklungsarbeiten in Luftfahrt, Raumfahrt, Energie und Verkehr sind in nationale und internationale Kooperationen eingebunden. Das Forschungsportfolio des DLR reicht von der Grundlagenforschung bis hin zur Entwicklung von innovativen Anwendungen und Produkten von morgen. So trägt das im DLR gewonnene wissenschaftliche und technische Know-how zur Stärkung des Industrie- und Technologiestandortes Deutschland bei. Das DLR beschäftigt circa 6 900 Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter, es unterhält 33 Institute bzw. Test- und Betriebseinrichtungen und ist an 13 Standorten in Deutschland vertreten.
Im Institut für Verkehrssystemtechnik arbeiten über 115 Wissenschaftler – Ingenieure, Psychologen und Informatiker – an den Standorten Braunschweig und Berlin. Sie leisten Forschung und Entwicklung für Automotive- und Bahnsysteme und für das Verkehrsmanagement. Und damit erbringen sie einen Beitrag zur Erhöhung der Sicherheit und Effizienz des Verkehrs auf Straße und Schiene. Die Wissenschaftler arbeiten auf nationaler und internationaler Ebene mit Partnern und Kunden aus Wirtschaft, Wissenschaft und Politik eng zusammen.

The press release may be downloaded in English [.pdf] and in German [.pdf].
Photo 1 and Photo 2 in high resolution [.jpg].

Contact for journalists:
Birgit Pattberg,
Tel. +49 (0) 531 – 295 3418





Driving at the Press of a Button
At the HAVEit Final Event, 17 partners from the European automotive industry and scientific community are set to demonstrate the highly automated future of driving. The EU funded project aimed at increasing driving safety and boosting the European automot

Continental Achieves Highly-Automated Driving Using Production-Ready Technologies
Continental's Architecture Migration Demonstrator shows how a vehicle automation system with basic functions can be developed using the technologies available today. The system could soon be developed further into series production.

A Truck that Keeps Track in Congestion
Volvo’s prototype Automated Queue Assistance (AQuA) supports truck drivers in traffic congestion through numerous sensors that monitor the surroundings and take decisions autonomously.

Driving without a Driver – Volkswagen presents the “Temporary Auto Pilot”
Prof. Dr. Jürgen Leohold: “An important milestone on the path towards fully automatic and accident-free driving.”

Predicting the Future for Advanced Energy Management
A new generation of buses predicts the immediate future in order to better take advantage of their hybrid motor – Active Green Driving.

Electrical Brake System Increases Traffic Safety and Handling of Trucks
A new brake-by-wire-system shortens braking distance by 15 percent.

Assistance and Automation Levels Enhance Future Driving Safety, Efficiency and Comfort
Continental Achieves Highly-Automated Driving Using Production-Ready Technologies
Continental's Architecture Migration Demonstrator shows how a vehicle automation system with basic functions can be developed using the technologies available today. The system could soon be developed further into series production.

Highly Automated Driving Taking Shape
EU funded project HAVEit is set to make vehicles safer, more environmentally- friendly and efficient by enhancing their level of automation. After more than three years of research work on intelligent driver assistance systems, seven vehicles demonstratin

2010 Annual EUCAR Conference: Volkswagen Group Research gives presentation of EU Commission HAVEit research project
Wolfsburg / Brussels, 2010-11-08 Prof. Juergen Leohold, Head of Volkswagen Group Research and a member of the EUCAR Council, today presented Volkswagen’s HAVEit research vehicle to the EU Commissioner for the Digital Agenda, Neelie Kroes.

 
   HAVEit - Highly Automated Vehicles for Intelligent Transport